Tag: "unemployment"

New Fed Study On Unemployment Benefits

If the North Carolina experience with unemployment benefits was not convincing enough for naysayers, a new report from the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis finds that the expiration of unemployment benefits in December 2013 may have reduced unemployment in early 2014.  No surprise here, but worth noting.

North Carolina’s Success

Back in January, I wrote about the pitfalls of extending unemployment benefits.  Several studies have found that long periods of unemployment benefits exacerbate unemployment and reduce the incentive to find work.  A year ago, North Carolina opted not to receive federal unemployment benefits extension, and their decision paid off, as John Hood writes in the […]

Seattle and Midland: A Tale of Two Cities

I was perusing the latest news on jobs and wages this morning, and I have been intrigued by the happenings in Seattle recently – the city council’s approval to raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour (phased in over seven years) and now a proposed plan for free universal pre-school paid for with a $58 […]

The (Lack of) Labor Force

While USA Today and other mainstream papers are wringing their hands over the lack of women workers in Silicon Valley, perhaps we should be more concerned about the lack of male and female workers…and jobs…period. A Third of America’s 18-34 Year Olds Live With Their Parents  Business Insider Record Number of Working-Age Men Are Not Working  […]

Income Inequality and the Minimum Wage

Yesterday, the Congressional Budget Office released a report that estimated the effects of an increase in the minimum wage.   There were two scenarios:  Raising the minimum wage to $10.10 an hour by 2016 and then adjusting annually for inflation, or raising the minimum wage to $9.00 an hour by 2016 with no adjustments for inflation. The […]

Here We Go Again…the State of the Union

It’s that time again.  For those of you who missed the SOTU last night, here are a few highlights of some eyebrow-raising claims and questionable statements: “Upward mobility has remained stagnant…” If the meaning is that upward mobility has not changed, the president is correct.  But the term “stagnant” is normally associated with something that is negatively stubborn, such as […]

Apprenticeships May Be the Way to Go

In this morning’s NCPA Daily Policy Digest, we featured a story from the Wall Street Journal about the popularity of apprenticeship programs in Europe…offered by businesses themselves.  This contrasts sharply to the lack of involvement of American businesses in training their workers and the public policy push of “college at all costs.”  As I noted […]

The “Feel-Goodism” of Unemployment Insurance Benefit Extensions

Next week the Senate will vote on a bill to extend unemployment benefits for another three months to some 1.3 million unemployed whose benefits expired on December 28.   At a cost of a whopping $6.5 billion, it is expected to produce $141 million in revenue over the next 10 years.  (Unemployment benefits are taxed, after […]

Don’t Raise the Minimum Wage, Says a Former Minimum Wage Employee

Interesting perspective from a former fast food and retail employee-turned-columnist John Hawkins.  Read here at Townhall.    

Retirement and Dependency (In Reverse)

A CNN Money article highlighted a recent survey examining worldwide retirement trends.  The survey, conducted by HSBC, found that 18 percent of Americans expect never to retire.  This is only slightly lower than the 19 percent of British who expect never to retire, but much higher than the global average of 12 percent. When I first read […]