Tag: "unemployment"

Are Weekly Jobless Claims Numbers a Concern? Yes and No.

Economists’ predictions were a bit off this week pertaining to the number of applications filed for unemployment benefits, according to Shobhana Chandra in Bloomberg.  Forty-eight economists surveyed predicted 290,000 jobless claims for the week ending January 10.  But the actual count was 316,000, the most since early September.  Is this a cause for concern?  In and of […]

Los Angeles Planning to Hike the Minimum Wage for Hotel Employees

Just when I thought the granola state could not get any nuttier, here comes a city-council approved plan (to be subject to a final procedural vote and the mayor’s signature), to hike the minimum wage for employees of large hotels to $15.37 an hour. The law would apply to hotels with 300 or more rooms […]

What’s In a Wage?

Today the Bureau of Labor Statistics released its quarterly report (June 2014) on the cost of employee compensation.  The average hourly wage for U.S. workers in the private sector was $21.02.  Broken down: The average hourly wage for private sector full-time workers in all industries was $24.04.  For part-time workers it was $12.37. The average […]

More Evidence: Unemployment Benefits Hurt the Unemployed

In an earlier post, I highlighted a study from the Federal Reserve concluding that the extension of unemployment benefits through December 2013 may have prolonged unemployment. Several previous studies over the past decades have suggested this same effect of unemployment benefits.  To add to the body of evidence, a study just released from the House […]

Headlines That Are Not Screaming “Economic Recovery!”

Working Part Time – But Not by Choice (St. Louis Fed) 36 Percent of Adults Lack Retirement Savings, Including Many 65 or Older (Los Angeles Times) Five Years of Weak Wages (ABC News) From April to July 2014, the number of employed youth 16 to 24 years old increased by 2.1 million to 20.1 million […]

New Fed Study On Unemployment Benefits

If the North Carolina experience with unemployment benefits was not convincing enough for naysayers, a new report from the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis finds that the expiration of unemployment benefits in December 2013 may have reduced unemployment in early 2014.  No surprise here, but worth noting.

North Carolina’s Success

Back in January, I wrote about the pitfalls of extending unemployment benefits.  Several studies have found that long periods of unemployment benefits exacerbate unemployment and reduce the incentive to find work.  A year ago, North Carolina opted not to receive federal unemployment benefits extension, and their decision paid off, as John Hood writes in the […]

Seattle and Midland: A Tale of Two Cities

I was perusing the latest news on jobs and wages this morning, and I have been intrigued by the happenings in Seattle recently – the city council’s approval to raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour (phased in over seven years) and now a proposed plan for free universal pre-school paid for with a $58 […]

The (Lack of) Labor Force

While USA Today and other mainstream papers are wringing their hands over the lack of women workers in Silicon Valley, perhaps we should be more concerned about the lack of male and female workers…and jobs…period. A Third of America’s 18-34 Year Olds Live With Their Parents  Business Insider Record Number of Working-Age Men Are Not Working  […]

Income Inequality and the Minimum Wage

Yesterday, the Congressional Budget Office released a report that estimated the effects of an increase in the minimum wage.   There were two scenarios:  Raising the minimum wage to $10.10 an hour by 2016 and then adjusting annually for inflation, or raising the minimum wage to $9.00 an hour by 2016 with no adjustments for inflation. The […]