Tag: "seniors"

The High Marginal Cost of the Social Security Benefits Tax

In yesterday’s Dallas Morning News, financial columnist Scott Burns discussed the hard-hitting Social Security benefits tax.  Using Turbo-Tax, he demonstrates how middle-income seniors (those earning $41,343 to $77,343) are hit by the tax.  Since the income thresholds are not adjusted for inflation, but Social Security benefits are, more seniors will have pay the tax as […]

Seniors Are in Debt, But Not as Bad Off as They Could Be

Two year ago, I produced a piece on how baby boomers spend their money.  I wanted to find out why many of them were not nearly prepared for retirement.   This time around, I wanted to find out how senior citizens were spending their money.  A lot has changed compared to the same age group just 20 years ago: Today’s seniors (age […]

Major Tax Savings That May Not Be Around Next Year

There are several tax cuts that are set to expire at the end of the year.  While it is not yet known whether they will be extended into tax year 2014 (and it may be months before we know for sure), now is the time to assume their demise and take advantage of them this year.  […]

Retirement and Dependency (In Reverse)

A CNN Money article highlighted a recent survey examining worldwide retirement trends.  The survey, conducted by HSBC, found that 18 percent of Americans expect never to retire.  This is only slightly lower than the 19 percent of British who expect never to retire, but much higher than the global average of 12 percent. When I first read […]

Are Millennials Ready for Social Security Reform?

Government is very good at crowding out private sector activities.  When government borrows, it can cause interest rates to rise and crowd out more productive private sector borrowing.  When government expands welfare programs to help the hungry and homeless, the effect is the crowding out of individual giving to more efficient private-sector programs.  And decades […]

Worse than I Imagined (Part II): Medicare

When I retired, Medicare became my primary health insurance, fully covered by American taxpayers (and federal debt-holders), while Anthem/Blue Cross became my secondary health insurance, fully covered by the University of California.  I will never have to spend a nickel of my Social Security benefits or inflation-adjusted defined retirement income on my health insurance. But […]

Measuring Poverty

Special blog post by Lewis Warne, an NCPA research associate. In 2011 Congress defunded the Supplemental Poverty Measure (SPM, an). The SPM is an alternative to the Official Poverty Measure (OPM) that has been used since the 1960s.  The goal of the SPM is to provide a more comprehensive picture of poverty by including factors left out […]

Seniors Living on Borrowed Money

Special blog post by Lewis Warne, an NCPA research associate. More than half a century ago, the elderly were more likely to live in poverty than any other age group.  Thankfully, that has changed, and the poverty rate for people aged 65 and over was less than 10 percent in 2010. Sadly, however, more elderly are […]

Nervously Holding Bonds

cialis online     The stock market is getting a bad reputation these days. It waxes and wanes hour by hour depending on everything from who is elected president to the future of twinkies and cupcakes. Never mind that in the grand scheme of things, individual stock returns are really based on corporate earnings, and […]

How Are Baby Boomers Spending Their Money?

order viagra without prescription In an August blog post, I referenced a New York Times Economix blog article highlighting the falling median income among 55 to 64 year olds during the past three years.  One of my blog readers asked me about consumer spending for this age group.  Has it fallen along with income? Alas, […]