Tag: "labor force participation rate"

What’s In An Unemployment Rate?

More than you might think.  The Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today that October’s unemployment rate was 4.9 percent, one-tenth of a point lower than September.  For six out of the past 10 months the unemployment rate has been at 4.9 percent, but how do the numbers behind the rate compare when it was 4.9 percent […]

Forget the 4.9% Unemployment Rate; 95 Million are not Working

New government data shows that job growth slowed in January.   According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the economy added 151,000 new jobs and the unemployment rate went down to 4.9 percent. But the low unemployment numbers are partially distorted by the low 62.7% labor participation rate that continues to dominate the so-called “Obama Recovery.” […]

The “Not-So-Secret” Secret

Last week, Gallup CEO Jim Clifton made headlines when he called the 5.6 percent unemployment rate stated by the BLS as a “big lie.”  While Clifton made it sound as though this was some type of cover-up, it really is no surprise.  The real unemployment (U-6) rate – including those who are working only part-time […]

Are Weekly Jobless Claims Numbers a Concern? Yes and No.

Economists’ predictions were a bit off this week pertaining to the number of applications filed for unemployment benefits, according to Shobhana Chandra in Bloomberg.  Forty-eight economists surveyed predicted 290,000 jobless claims for the week ending January 10.  But the actual count was 316,000, the most since early September.  Is this a cause for concern?  In and of […]

More Evidence: Unemployment Benefits Hurt the Unemployed

In an earlier post, I highlighted a study from the Federal Reserve concluding that the extension of unemployment benefits through December 2013 may have prolonged unemployment. Several previous studies over the past decades have suggested this same effect of unemployment benefits.  To add to the body of evidence, a study just released from the House […]

New Fed Study On Unemployment Benefits

If the North Carolina experience with unemployment benefits was not convincing enough for naysayers, a new report from the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis finds that the expiration of unemployment benefits in December 2013 may have reduced unemployment in early 2014.  No surprise here, but worth noting.

North Carolina’s Success

Back in January, I wrote about the pitfalls of extending unemployment benefits.  Several studies have found that long periods of unemployment benefits exacerbate unemployment and reduce the incentive to find work.  A year ago, North Carolina opted not to receive federal unemployment benefits extension, and their decision paid off, as John Hood writes in the […]

Seattle and Midland: A Tale of Two Cities

I was perusing the latest news on jobs and wages this morning, and I have been intrigued by the happenings in Seattle recently – the city council’s approval to raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour (phased in over seven years) and now a proposed plan for free universal pre-school paid for with a $58 […]

The (Lack of) Labor Force

While USA Today and other mainstream papers are wringing their hands over the lack of women workers in Silicon Valley, perhaps we should be more concerned about the lack of male and female workers…and jobs…period. A Third of America’s 18-34 Year Olds Live With Their Parents  Business Insider Record Number of Working-Age Men Are Not Working  […]

The Manufactured Gender Gap Problem

A recent analysis of workers in Google’s high tech industry finds, as put by USA Today, “The world of high tech looks like an exclusive boys’ club.” Diversity numbers released by Google shows that 83 percent of its tech workers are male, and 60 percent of its workers are white.  Even though the USA Today article […]