Tag: "employment"

Seattle and Midland: A Tale of Two Cities

I was perusing the latest news on jobs and wages this morning, and I have been intrigued by the happenings in Seattle recently – the city council’s approval to raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour (phased in over seven years) and now a proposed plan for free universal pre-school paid for with a $58 […]

You Read It Here First…Maybe College is Overrated

In a recent Bloomberg article, Ohio University economist Richard Vedder wrote about the plethora of college degrees being churned out annually compared to the supply of jobs that historically not required a degree.  Dr. Vedder is an expert in higher education and has long bemoaned the “college at all costs” policy used to promote federal student […]

Income Inequality from a Plain-Spoken Perspective

Earlier this week, I participated in a televised panel discussion on income inequality.  The topic has generated much discussion lately, as President Obama’s central theme has been how to fix the gap between the rich and the poor.  My general thought is it simply cannot be fixed by dragging out the usual redistribution solutions – […]

States Are Turning Their Attention to Apprenticeships

With so much federal money poured into college aid, resulting in recent graduates mired in loan debt, it is refreshing that more attention is being paid to apprenticeships.  Some states are recognizing the importance in helping businesses boost these declining opportunities.  Read the WSJ article.

More On the Minimum Wage Debate

Last weekend, the Wall Street Journal ran an excellent article by Michael Saltsman, director at the Employment Policies Institute.  He rightfully noted that the examples President Obama uses of businesses that pay their employees well above minimum wage are businesses that can afford to do so.  For example, on a stop at the University of […]

Income Inequality and the Minimum Wage

Yesterday, the Congressional Budget Office released a report that estimated the effects of an increase in the minimum wage.   There were two scenarios:  Raising the minimum wage to $10.10 an hour by 2016 and then adjusting annually for inflation, or raising the minimum wage to $9.00 an hour by 2016 with no adjustments for inflation. The […]

Taking from the Top 40 Percent

Last week, the Wall Street Journal ran an article written by Scott Hodge of the Tax Foundation.  If we want true income equality, according to Mr. Hodge, income would have to be taken from the top 40 percent of income earners and distributed to the bottom 60 percent.  So redistribution is not just limited to […]

And the CBO Report is Supposed To Be Good News?

In a rather bizarre White House press briefing yesterday, Chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers Jason Furman told reporters that the latest estimate that the Affordable Care Act will cause the loss of some 2.5 million jobs over the next 10 years is apparently a good thing.  He responded to a question about the Congressional […]

Where Does Your City Stand in the War on Lemonade Stands?

As part of the ongoing effort to crush the entrepreneurial spirit of children, several municipalities have targeted lemonade stands.  That’s right…how dare those children selling lemonade attempt to take your money for providing a potentially bacteria-laden , unhealthy, loaded-with-sugar beverage, that has been stirred and handled by the grimy hands of 10 year olds….on a sidewalk not […]

Here We Go Again…the State of the Union

It’s that time again.  For those of you who missed the SOTU last night, here are a few highlights of some eyebrow-raising claims and questionable statements: “Upward mobility has remained stagnant…” If the meaning is that upward mobility has not changed, the president is correct.  But the term “stagnant” is normally associated with something that is negatively stubborn, such as […]