Tag: "employment"

Income Inequality and the Minimum Wage

Yesterday, the Congressional Budget Office released a report that estimated the effects of an increase in the minimum wage.   There were two scenarios:  Raising the minimum wage to $10.10 an hour by 2016 and then adjusting annually for inflation, or raising the minimum wage to $9.00 an hour by 2016 with no adjustments for inflation. The […]

Taking from the Top 40 Percent

Last week, the Wall Street Journal ran an article written by Scott Hodge of the Tax Foundation.  If we want true income equality, according to Mr. Hodge, income would have to be taken from the top 40 percent of income earners and distributed to the bottom 60 percent.  So redistribution is not just limited to […]

And the CBO Report is Supposed To Be Good News?

In a rather bizarre White House press briefing yesterday, Chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers Jason Furman told reporters that the latest estimate that the Affordable Care Act will cause the loss of some 2.5 million jobs over the next 10 years is apparently a good thing.  He responded to a question about the Congressional […]

Where Does Your City Stand in the War on Lemonade Stands?

As part of the ongoing effort to crush the entrepreneurial spirit of children, several municipalities have targeted lemonade stands.  That’s right…how dare those children selling lemonade attempt to take your money for providing a potentially bacteria-laden , unhealthy, loaded-with-sugar beverage, that has been stirred and handled by the grimy hands of 10 year olds….on a sidewalk not […]

Here We Go Again…the State of the Union

It’s that time again.  For those of you who missed the SOTU last night, here are a few highlights of some eyebrow-raising claims and questionable statements: “Upward mobility has remained stagnant…” If the meaning is that upward mobility has not changed, the president is correct.  But the term “stagnant” is normally associated with something that is negatively stubborn, such as […]

Apprenticeships May Be the Way to Go

In this morning’s NCPA Daily Policy Digest, we featured a story from the Wall Street Journal about the popularity of apprenticeship programs in Europe…offered by businesses themselves.  This contrasts sharply to the lack of involvement of American businesses in training their workers and the public policy push of “college at all costs.”  As I noted […]

The “Feel-Goodism” of Unemployment Insurance Benefit Extensions

Next week the Senate will vote on a bill to extend unemployment benefits for another three months to some 1.3 million unemployed whose benefits expired on December 28.   At a cost of a whopping $6.5 billion, it is expected to produce $141 million in revenue over the next 10 years.  (Unemployment benefits are taxed, after […]

Don’t Raise the Minimum Wage, Says a Former Minimum Wage Employee

Interesting perspective from a former fast food and retail employee-turned-columnist John Hawkins.  Read here at Townhall.    

Buying American

While I was skimming through my local newspaper this morning, I found an article on the op-ed page by columnist Froma Harrop.  Her question is, are we willing to pay more for clothes that are made in the United States?  While the liberal Ms. Harrop is not known for her civility towards the conservatives with […]

Why a “Living Wage” in D.C. Does Not Make Sense

Recently, Washington D.C.’s council almost (but not quite) passed an ordinance that would require Walmart and other large big-box stores to pay a “living wage” of $12.50 an hour.  Being that 23,000 applications were submitted for the 600 jobs that will be available as Walmart opens its first store in the area, it is evident that workers have […]