Tag: "economy"

Yes, State Taxes Matter

A recent study by the Mercatus Center at George Mason University found that, unsurprisingly, states with higher taxes have lower economic growth, even when controlling for a variety of factors including a state’s population growth, educational attainment, and value of natural resources.  One of the study’s findings?  A one-percent increase in the average tax rate […]

New Fed Study On Unemployment Benefits

If the North Carolina experience with unemployment benefits was not convincing enough for naysayers, a new report from the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis finds that the expiration of unemployment benefits in December 2013 may have reduced unemployment in early 2014.  No surprise here, but worth noting.

Seattle and Midland: A Tale of Two Cities

I was perusing the latest news on jobs and wages this morning, and I have been intrigued by the happenings in Seattle recently – the city council’s approval to raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour (phased in over seven years) and now a proposed plan for free universal pre-school paid for with a $58 […]

You Read It Here First…Maybe College is Overrated

In a recent Bloomberg article, Ohio University economist Richard Vedder wrote about the plethora of college degrees being churned out annually compared to the supply of jobs that historically not required a degree.  Dr. Vedder is an expert in higher education and has long bemoaned the “college at all costs” policy used to promote federal student […]

States Are Turning Their Attention to Apprenticeships

With so much federal money poured into college aid, resulting in recent graduates mired in loan debt, it is refreshing that more attention is being paid to apprenticeships.  Some states are recognizing the importance in helping businesses boost these declining opportunities.  Read the WSJ article.

The Camp Tax Reform Plan Is a Good Start With a Few Caveats

Rep. Dave Camp (R-MI) unveiled a plan today (executive summary here) to simplify the tax code and reduce income tax rates, from the current seven rates to just two rates:  10 percent and 25 percent.   It also groups personal family exemptions into three categories instead of the usual six:  a larger standard deduction, a larger […]

Taking from the Top 40 Percent

Last week, the Wall Street Journal ran an article written by Scott Hodge of the Tax Foundation.  If we want true income equality, according to Mr. Hodge, income would have to be taken from the top 40 percent of income earners and distributed to the bottom 60 percent.  So redistribution is not just limited to […]

And the CBO Report is Supposed To Be Good News?

In a rather bizarre White House press briefing yesterday, Chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers Jason Furman told reporters that the latest estimate that the Affordable Care Act will cause the loss of some 2.5 million jobs over the next 10 years is apparently a good thing.  He responded to a question about the Congressional […]

Here We Go Again…the State of the Union

It’s that time again.  For those of you who missed the SOTU last night, here are a few highlights of some eyebrow-raising claims and questionable statements: “Upward mobility has remained stagnant…” If the meaning is that upward mobility has not changed, the president is correct.  But the term “stagnant” is normally associated with something that is negatively stubborn, such as […]

Don’t Raise the Minimum Wage, Says a Former Minimum Wage Employee

Interesting perspective from a former fast food and retail employee-turned-columnist John Hawkins.  Read here at Townhall.