The Manufactured Gender Gap Problem

A recent analysis of workers in Google’s high tech industry finds, as put by USA Today, “The world of high tech looks like an exclusive boys’ club.” Diversity numbers released by Google shows that 83 percent of its tech workers are male, and 60 percent of its workers are white.  Even though the USA Today article […]

You Read It Here First…Maybe College is Overrated

In a recent Bloomberg article, Ohio University economist Richard Vedder wrote about the plethora of college degrees being churned out annually compared to the supply of jobs that historically not required a degree.  Dr. Vedder is an expert in higher education and has long bemoaned the “college at all costs” policy used to promote federal student […]

Income Inequality from a Plain-Spoken Perspective

Earlier this week, I participated in a televised panel discussion on income inequality.  The topic has generated much discussion lately, as President Obama’s central theme has been how to fix the gap between the rich and the poor.  My general thought is it simply cannot be fixed by dragging out the usual redistribution solutions – […]

Countries Failing to Protect Inventors’ Rights In Medical Innovation

The U.S. Trade Representative just released its “Special 301” report, which lists countries that fail to enforce intellectual-property rights. Protecting inventors’ property rights is necessary to attract investment in medical research and development, as well as a moral imperative for government. Yet, countries at all levels of development fail in this duty. India is singled […]

Anywhere But Illinois?

A Gallup poll released last week found that half of residents in Illinois would move if they could.  Half?  Runner up states were Connecticut (49 percent) and Maryland (47 percent).  What’s going on?  Reading further down, it appears that for those in these states who are actually planning a move to another state in the […]

Priorities, Please

This just in…while a controversy is brewing over Chicago’s crime numbers (a curious drop in crime has led some to believe the police department is “cooking the books,”) the city’s aldermen have taken a drastic measure to improve the quality of life for residents.  Since the real scourge on the city is plastic bags, they […]

States Are Turning Their Attention to Apprenticeships

With so much federal money poured into college aid, resulting in recent graduates mired in loan debt, it is refreshing that more attention is being paid to apprenticeships.  Some states are recognizing the importance in helping businesses boost these declining opportunities.  Read the WSJ article.

More On the Minimum Wage Debate

Last weekend, the Wall Street Journal ran an excellent article by Michael Saltsman, director at the Employment Policies Institute.  He rightfully noted that the examples President Obama uses of businesses that pay their employees well above minimum wage are businesses that can afford to do so.  For example, on a stop at the University of […]

A Quick Guide to the Public Pension Crisis

The NCPA has written numerous publications on the unfunded liabilities of Social Security and possible reforms.   We have also addressed unfunded liabilities of state and local public pensions.   But one of my readers alerted me to her infographic that quite nicely sums up the Social Security and states’ pension crises, for those with no time […]

Dallas’ New Bag Tax: What’s the Point?

Yesterday the Dallas City Council passed an ordinance that would require retailers to charge 5 cents per paper or plastic bag used by consumers.  While this is not an all-out ban on plastic bags, it does punish consumers who make the choice to use a plastic or paper bag instead of bringing their own reusable […]