Category: Tax Issues

Bloomberg-Funded Soda Tax Study Does Not Answer the Relevant Questions

Yesterday, I received an email from Health Affairs linking to some new studies that will run in their upcoming print edition.  One of them, “In Mexico, Evidence Of Sustained Consumer Response Two Years After Implementing A Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Tax,” caught my eye for obvious reasons.  First, using soda taxes to reduce the consumption of sugary drinks, […]

Tax Extenders in 2017

In a rush to keep the government funded through April 2017, Congress passed a $1.1 trillion spending bill last month that includes no mention of tax cut extensions that expired at the end of 2016.  But take heart, most of the tax breaks that folks have become accustomed to were made permanent at the end […]

Hillary’s Tax Plan: A Wealth Transfer from Nearly Everybody (Not Just the Rich) to Big Government

Two weeks ago, presidential candidate Hillary Clinton spoke to an audience in Warren, Michigan laying out her plans for the economy should she become president.  Of course, this was before NCPA released a new study on Clinton’s tax plan, which is now available.  In her speech, she asked four questions, and based on our analysis […]

A Guide to Inequality

Senator Bernie Sanders has now officially dropped out of the race and endorsed Hillary Clinton for President. Despite his loss, the achievement of his campaign should not be dismissed, especially his success with younger voters through populist rhetoric.  Speaking at the Vatican, Senator Sanders stated that “[A]s an increasing share of new wealth and income […]

Again…We Should Be More Like Europe

Last week I wrote about big changes taking place in the United Kingdom, where Chancellor Osborne vowed to reduce corporate tax rates to 17 percent, the lowest of the G20 countries.   Meanwhile, the United States seems to want to keep its first place spot of having the highest corporate tax rate of the G20.  And […]

In Some Ways, We Should Be More Like Europe

Namely, the United Kingdom.  Yesterday Chancellor George Osborne announced his plan to lower the corporate tax rate from its current 20 percent to 17 percent in 2018. (It was originally planned to fall to 18 percent in 2018). Additionally, the U.K. capital gains tax top rate will all from 28 percent to 20 percent, and […]

The Superbowl of Jock Taxes

For anybody who thinks that professional athletes get paid too much, here is an interesting article from Forbes on the “jock tax.”  According to K. Sean Packard, Carolina Panthers quarterback Cam Newton will be hit with a hefty tax bill simply for playing in the Superbowl, located this year in Santa Clara, California.  His tax […]

It’s That Time Again…for Tax Extenders

Congress and the Administration approved the FY 2016 Consolidated Appropriations Act nearly two weeks ago, which will fund the federal government through September 30, 2016 to the tune of $1.149 trillion. The Omnibus bill includes $548 billion in defense spending, $58.8 billion for the War on Terror and $518 billion in non-defense spending. (Remember those spending caps in the Budget […]

Flattening Tax Rates

To date, five Republican presidential candidates have announced tax proposals that have at least one thing in common – simplifying the current tax code. In its most basic form, a flat tax taxes all income once, at the source, at the same rate. While Senators Cruz and Rubio have suggested one 10% and 15% rate […]

Trump’s Tax Plan and the Deficit

Structurally, Donald Trump’s tax plan is pretty much like every other Republican tax reform proposal.  Nothing really new or exciting to sink your teeth into.  Fewer individual tax brackets, lower rates, elimination of the Alternative Minimum Tax, a lower corporate tax rate, and elimination of the estate tax.  A little hoopla about repatriating foreign earnings […]