Category: Employment Issues

Minimum Wage Hikes: A Tale of Two Cities

In the past few months, separate studies have found differing impacts of minimum wage hikes in San Francisco and Seattle.  Harvard Business School looked at data in San Francisco from 2008-2016, focusing on minimum wage effects on restaurant market exit.  They found that minimum wage increases in San Francisco delayed firm entry across the board […]

Wages and the Cost of Employment

Recently, William Galston of the Brookings Institution penned an oped in the Wall Street Journal about the lack of workers’ wage growth despite a technically “full-employment” economy.  Adjusted for inflation, workers’ wages have grown 0.1 percent over the past year, and only 0.5 percent since 2010.  While there are many unknowns, he attributes some of the problem […]

Give Private Sector Workers An Option That Federal Workers Already Have

Two days ago, the House passed the “Working Families Flexibility Act of 2017,” that would allow employers to offer, and employees to receive, 1.5 hours comp time in lieu of overtime pay for any overtime hours worked.  It now must pass the Senate.  This a policy that the NCPA has long supported in modernizing the […]

Keeping Regulatory Agency Power in Check

On Tuesday, President Trump signed H.J. Res 83, utilizing the Congressional Review Act (CRA) to officially and forever invalidate the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA) recent overreach of regulatory authority. The rule, informally referred to as the “Volks” rule, gave OSHA the ability to issue citations to employers for failing to record work-related injuries […]

Don’t Gut the Texas Workers’ Comp System

President Trump has some lofty goals for his first year in office, but during his first month in office, he spent ample time undoing many executive orders ushered in by the Obama administration. One particular area of concern was some controversial rules and actions from the Department of Labor.  Former Labor Secretary (now the Democratic […]

Employers Beware, NLRB Shows Grit in Protecting Walkouts and Informal Strikes by Non-union Workers

Employers are finding themselves on thin ice in their response to employees’ walkouts, informal strikes and other activities that include demands for higher wages and improved working conditions. However, employees who participate in “general strikes” unrelated to work, such as the “general strike against Trump” planned for February 17, may not be protected by federal […]

Not So Fast On the Overtime Rule, Says Judge

Last week, a U.S. District judge issued a preliminary injunction against the Department of Labor’s new overtime pay rule, scheduled to take effect on Thursday.  The rule doubles the threshold under which salaried employees are required to receive overtime pay.  The NCPA published two reports on the negative effects of this rule and potential job losses as a […]

Is Seattle’s Minimum Wage Being Passed on to Consumers?

Last week, voters in Washington state approved a statewide hike in the minimum wage to $13.50 an hour by the year 2020.  The current minimum wage of $9.47 an hour would jump to $11.00 an hour on January 1 and would incrementally increase thereafter.  Voters also approved mandatory paid sick leave for employees.  In areas […]

Three Reasons Donald Trump Won

Donald Trump’s stunning victory last night left media and political pundits shocked and in some cases, horrified.  But for anybody who has not benefited from the post-2008 economic recovery (and there are still many), this upset came as no surprise.  Here are three factors I believe that the media and pundits underestimated. Despite an economic “recovery,” […]

What’s In An Unemployment Rate?

More than you might think.  The Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today that October’s unemployment rate was 4.9 percent, one-tenth of a point lower than September.  For six out of the past 10 months the unemployment rate has been at 4.9 percent, but how do the numbers behind the rate compare when it was 4.9 percent […]