Category: Employment Issues

Will Minimum Wage Hikes Help Red States or Hurt Them?

Last night voters in four “red” states approved minimum wage increases over the next few years.  The highest wage on the ballot was in Alaska, which will increase to $9.75 an hour by 2016 (indexed to inflation).  One on hand, it should be up to states to decide what their wages will be.  They have a better idea of how […]

Los Angeles Planning to Hike the Minimum Wage for Hotel Employees

Just when I thought the granola state could not get any nuttier, here comes a city-council approved plan (to be subject to a final procedural vote and the mayor’s signature), to hike the minimum wage for employees of large hotels to $15.37 an hour. The law would apply to hotels with 300 or more rooms […]

What’s In a Wage?

Today the Bureau of Labor Statistics released its quarterly report (June 2014) on the cost of employee compensation.  The average hourly wage for U.S. workers in the private sector was $21.02.  Broken down: The average hourly wage for private sector full-time workers in all industries was $24.04.  For part-time workers it was $12.37. The average […]

More Evidence: Unemployment Benefits Hurt the Unemployed

In an earlier post, I highlighted a study from the Federal Reserve concluding that the extension of unemployment benefits through December 2013 may have prolonged unemployment. Several previous studies over the past decades have suggested this same effect of unemployment benefits.  To add to the body of evidence, a study just released from the House […]

Surprise! Washington, D.C. is Still the Worst Place for Teens to Find Employment

Townhall’s Political Calculations found that Washington, D.C. tops the list for the worst teenage employment/population ratio in the United States.  Based on their chart, it appears that only 15 percent of D.C. teenagers age 16 to 19 are actually working, and they have taken the lead with dismal statistics for many years.  Keep in mind […]

New Fed Study On Unemployment Benefits

If the North Carolina experience with unemployment benefits was not convincing enough for naysayers, a new report from the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis finds that the expiration of unemployment benefits in December 2013 may have reduced unemployment in early 2014.  No surprise here, but worth noting.

North Carolina’s Success

Back in January, I wrote about the pitfalls of extending unemployment benefits.  Several studies have found that long periods of unemployment benefits exacerbate unemployment and reduce the incentive to find work.  A year ago, North Carolina opted not to receive federal unemployment benefits extension, and their decision paid off, as John Hood writes in the […]

The (Lack of) Labor Force

While USA Today and other mainstream papers are wringing their hands over the lack of women workers in Silicon Valley, perhaps we should be more concerned about the lack of male and female workers…and jobs…period. A Third of America’s 18-34 Year Olds Live With Their Parents  Business Insider Record Number of Working-Age Men Are Not Working  […]

The Manufactured Gender Gap Problem

A recent analysis of workers in Google’s high tech industry finds, as put by USA Today, “The world of high tech looks like an exclusive boys’ club.” Diversity numbers released by Google shows that 83 percent of its tech workers are male, and 60 percent of its workers are white.  Even though the USA Today article […]

You Read It Here First…Maybe College is Overrated

In a recent Bloomberg article, Ohio University economist Richard Vedder wrote about the plethora of college degrees being churned out annually compared to the supply of jobs that historically not required a degree.  Dr. Vedder is an expert in higher education and has long bemoaned the “college at all costs” policy used to promote federal student […]