Category: Employment Issues

Lies, Damned Lies, and the 77 Percent Gender Pay Gap

A pet favorite issue of the left is their claim that women only make 77 cents for every dollar a man makes. With this fatal statistic in hand, wage justice warriors are usually quick to call for a whole new wave of regulations and pay mandates to fix such terrible and clear evidence of discrimination. […]

Obama’s Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Overtime Rule

Last week the White House updated the Fair Labor Standards Act’s (FLSA) overtime regulations, raising the threshold at which salaried employees are exempt from overtime pay, effective December 1, 2016. According to the updated requirements, salaried employees making up to $913 per week ($47,476 annually) will now qualify for overtime compensation of 1.5 times their […]

Mining Takes a Hit in the Jobs Report

While Hillary Clinton is trying to convince Coal Country that she cares, the BLS reports that 7,000 jobs in mining were lost in April alone, totaling 191,000 mining and mining-related jobs lost since September 2014.  Earlier this week I wrote about the lack of political support for “dirty jobs” that actually pay quite well, and […]

Another Take on Slow Wage Growth, Part II

Yesterday, I elaborated on a WSJ article and some historical data highlighting slow wage growth.  While some policymakers may just shrug and insist that slow wage and GDP growth are the “new normal,” others seem to believe that simply waving the magic $15 minimum wage wand will fix everything.  Both are wrong.  Here is what could […]

Should Walmart Imitate Costco?

The following is the Executive Summary from a soon-to-be-published NCPA policy report. There has been much debate over the past few years about raising the national minimum wage to $10 or even $15 an hour. In areas where the minimum wage is at or slightly above the federal level of $7.25, unions have complained that […]

Forget the 4.9% Unemployment Rate; 95 Million are not Working

New government data shows that job growth slowed in January.   According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the economy added 151,000 new jobs and the unemployment rate went down to 4.9 percent. But the low unemployment numbers are partially distorted by the low 62.7% labor participation rate that continues to dominate the so-called “Obama Recovery.” […]

Walmart’s Decision Not to Build Two More Stores in D.C. is no Surprise

After “promising” back in 2013 to build two stores east of the Anacostia River in Washington, D.C., Walmart has announced it will no longer do so.  One reason, according to the Washington Times, is that their three existing stores in D.C. are not performing as well as hoped.  But according to Townhall, the company also cited high building […]

Can the Job Market Continue to Pick Up Momentum?

Before I perused this morning’s employment summary from the BLS, I was not expecting much good news. While overall there is nothing spectacular to write about, there are some glimmers of hope.  The unemployment rate sat at 5 percent at the end of December, no change from last month.   But this does not tell us […]

Welders Do Not Earn More Than Philosophers, But Rubio Has a Point

During last night’s debate, Senator Marco Rubio applied economic principles to numerous subjects including the public school system, higher education and the job market.  In explaining his opposition to free college tuition – which has been championed by Hillary Clinton and Bernier Sanders – Sen. Rubio advocated for increasing vocational training. He stated, “For the […]

In the Minimum Wage Debate, There Is Still No Such Thing as a Free Lunch

The City Club, a progressive advocacy group in Portland, Oregon, recently published a report arguing that the city needs a higher minimum wage than the current state minimum wage of $9.25 an hour.  This will stimulate consumer spending, they say, by putting more money in the pockets of workers.  Additionally, they find that most businesses […]