Author Archive

Not So Fast On the Overtime Rule, Says Judge

Last week, a U.S. District judge issued a preliminary injunction against the Department of Labor’s new overtime pay rule, scheduled to take effect on Thursday.  The rule doubles the threshold under which salaried employees are required to receive overtime pay.  The NCPA published two reports on the negative effects of this rule and potential job losses as a […]

Is Seattle’s Minimum Wage Being Passed on to Consumers?

Last week, voters in Washington state approved a statewide hike in the minimum wage to $13.50 an hour by the year 2020.  The current minimum wage of $9.47 an hour would jump to $11.00 an hour on January 1 and would incrementally increase thereafter.  Voters also approved mandatory paid sick leave for employees.  In areas […]

Three Reasons Donald Trump Won

Donald Trump’s stunning victory last night left media and political pundits shocked and in some cases, horrified.  But for anybody who has not benefited from the post-2008 economic recovery (and there are still many), this upset came as no surprise.  Here are three factors I believe that the media and pundits underestimated. Despite an economic “recovery,” […]

What’s In An Unemployment Rate?

More than you might think.  The Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today that October’s unemployment rate was 4.9 percent, one-tenth of a point lower than September.  For six out of the past 10 months the unemployment rate has been at 4.9 percent, but how do the numbers behind the rate compare when it was 4.9 percent […]

The Truth About Social Security (That Was Ignored in the Debate)

Last night, both presidential candidates touched on Social Security and Medicare. I literally mean the word “touched” because there was not enough discussion of entitlements for me to conclude that either candidate “grasped” the subject. First, let’s look at Social Security. The annual Trust Fund report was quietly released in June of this year with […]

Will Wednesday’s Debate Delve Into Policy, or Am I Asking Too Much?

The last two debates have been dreadfully disappointing as far as the candidates addressing any substantive economic issues.  Based on studies from the NCPA’s Tax Analysis Center, Clinton’s and Trump’s economic plans produce vastly different results.  This is not surprising, of course, since these plans are predicated on different visions for the economy.  Mrs. Clinton wants […]

Hillary’s Tax Plan: A Wealth Transfer from Nearly Everybody (Not Just the Rich) to Big Government

Two weeks ago, presidential candidate Hillary Clinton spoke to an audience in Warren, Michigan laying out her plans for the economy should she become president.  Of course, this was before NCPA released a new study on Clinton’s tax plan, which is now available.  In her speech, she asked four questions, and based on our analysis […]

Not Much to Say About the Jobs Report

The July jobs report is out.  Nonfarm jobs rose by 255,000, which is more than economists predicted for July. But the unemployment rate still stands at 4.9 percent, and the labor force participation rate is a paltry 62.8 percent, only two-tenths of a point lower than last July.  In terms of demographics: Among all age […]

A Patently Silly Campaign Promise to Entrepreneurs…from Hillary

A colleague emailed me an article about Hillary Clinton’s new campaign pledge to entrepreneurs.  In a speech yesterday, she proposed delaying student loan payments for three years to those starting up a business.  If that business provides “social benefits,” she proposes that the entrepreneur could apply for debt forgiveness of up to $17,500 after five […]

Social Insecurity

The 2016 Social Security Trustees Report has been a long time coming.  Usually it is released in the spring (although last year it wasn’t released until July), but I can’t say I blame the Trustees for the delay.  It looks bad.  Worse than last year.  The program that pays yours and my retirement benefits, either […]