Author Archive

Politics and Investment Options Don’t Mix

In the midst of rightly placed concerns over proposed new Department of Labor (DOL) fiduciary rules for brokers, the DOL has also issued a new interpretive bulletin designed to politicize investment choices.  How so?  As Andy Kessler writes in the Wall Street Journal, a previous 2008 Interpretive Bulletin issued by the DOL encouraged pension fund […]

Welders Do Not Earn More Than Philosophers, But Rubio Has a Point

During last night’s debate, Senator Marco Rubio applied economic principles to numerous subjects including the public school system, higher education and the job market.  In explaining his opposition to free college tuition – which has been championed by Hillary Clinton and Bernier Sanders – Sen. Rubio advocated for increasing vocational training. He stated, “For the […]

In the Minimum Wage Debate, There Is Still No Such Thing as a Free Lunch

The City Club, a progressive advocacy group in Portland, Oregon, recently published a report arguing that the city needs a higher minimum wage than the current state minimum wage of $9.25 an hour.  This will stimulate consumer spending, they say, by putting more money in the pockets of workers.  Additionally, they find that most businesses […]

NCPA’s New DCGE Tax Model

In case you missed it yesterday, we here at NCPA are pleased to announce that we now have a tax model to – well – model taxes!  Developed by Beacon Hill Institute, the dynamic computable general equilibrium (DCGE) model, will measure the impact of tax changes on economic variables such as capital stock, employment and wages. […]

Home Ownership versus Other Investments

Earlier this week, I released a report on which income groups benefit from mortgage-related tax deductions. It has generally been known that higher-income households reap greater tax advantages than lower-income households. Furthermore, studies have found that mortgage deductions do not necessarily increase home ownership. But they are politically popular and not going away anytime soon. […]

A Double Whammy: Travel Taxes That Fund Stadiums

Last week, NCPA released a report on travel taxes.  Hotel occupancy taxes comprise the largest share of taxes on an average trip, while plane ticket taxes and rental car taxes rank second and third.  Travel taxes are politically easy to levy, because it is assumed that those who pay them are “out of towners” and […]

Can We Stop Pretending That the Trustees Reports Are Good News?

In previous years, the 2015 Social Security and Medicare Trustees Reports were usually released in the spring, albeit on a Friday or perhaps around a holiday when little attention would be paid.  This year, the reports were released yesterday, months later than usual, with little fanfare, except for a few media outlets praising the findings.   The Huffington Post […]

In Defense of Airlines

This probably is not the most interesting and relative blog of the day since the Supreme Court announced its King v. Burwell decision.  But for those who have thrown up their arms in despair over the SC’s obsession with protecting Obamacare, it’s time to move on to other, more mundane topics. In little known news, TIME […]

Here We Go Again: Crushing the Entrepreneurial Spirit of Young Americans

Every summer, the same issue surfaces.  Kids try to run a lemonade stand, and the law shuts them down without a proper permit from the city.  This time it happened in Texas.  (I would not be surprised if this happened in – oh, I don’t know – the people’s republic of Maryland.) But Texas?  The number […]

The New Normal

We are awaiting the May jobs report numbers but is there something of greater concern of which we should discuss.  The current forecasts are estimating a May jobs growth number somewhere around 200,000. Of course it will be touted as a positive – and we all want to see Americans getting back to work. However, this […]