Author Archive

Oops! The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Gets Slapped Down

I recently wrote about the Financial Stability Oversight Council created under Dodd-Frank legislation in 2010. A federal judge had ruled that the FSOC did not prove its case in determining that MetLife posed a “threat to financial stability.” Enter the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), another unaccountable entity, thanks to Dodd-Frank.  In 2014, the CFPB […]

Will Dodd-Frank Implode? Let’s Hope So

There have been a few interesting developments lately regarding legal interpretations of Dodd-Frank.  Unfortunately, media outlets are too busy covering trivial matters such as bathroom bills to focus on the impacts of this poorly-conceived legislation that has been in place since 2010.  However, the Wall Street Journal has not disappointed, covering some major developments in federal […]

Where is the Stock Market Panic Now?

It occurred to me this week that I had not heard much about the stock market since it started going south in January.  So I perused the Internet and came across some interesting article headlines from times past: “Dow Falls Below 8,000: First Time Since ’03” (ABC News, Nov. 19, 2008) “Wall Street Cheers as […]

Again…We Should Be More Like Europe

Last week I wrote about big changes taking place in the United Kingdom, where Chancellor Osborne vowed to reduce corporate tax rates to 17 percent, the lowest of the G20 countries.   Meanwhile, the United States seems to want to keep its first place spot of having the highest corporate tax rate of the G20.  And […]

In Some Ways, We Should Be More Like Europe

Namely, the United Kingdom.  Yesterday Chancellor George Osborne announced his plan to lower the corporate tax rate from its current 20 percent to 17 percent in 2018. (It was originally planned to fall to 18 percent in 2018). Additionally, the U.K. capital gains tax top rate will all from 28 percent to 20 percent, and […]

Should Walmart Imitate Costco?

The following is the Executive Summary from a soon-to-be-published NCPA policy report. There has been much debate over the past few years about raising the national minimum wage to $10 or even $15 an hour. In areas where the minimum wage is at or slightly above the federal level of $7.25, unions have complained that […]

Will the Joint Employer Rule Hurt Franchises?

Two significant rulings by the National Labor Relations Board in 2015 expanded the interpretation of the “joint employer” rule.  Joint employer is a designation given when two firms are involved in the employment practices of an employee. In a case involving Browning Ferris Industries, the NRLB ruled that Browning Ferris was not only responsible for those it […]

North Carolina Is on a Roll

I have previously written about some policy changes going on in North Carolina. They lowered their state income tax rates two years ago in order to become more competitive (see the NCPA analysis here), and they refused a federal extension of unemployment benefits in 2013, which resulted in their unemployment rate falling faster than the […]

The Superbowl of Jock Taxes

For anybody who thinks that professional athletes get paid too much, here is an interesting article from Forbes on the “jock tax.”  According to K. Sean Packard, Carolina Panthers quarterback Cam Newton will be hit with a hefty tax bill simply for playing in the Superbowl, located this year in Santa Clara, California.  His tax […]

Walmart’s Decision Not to Build Two More Stores in D.C. is no Surprise

After “promising” back in 2013 to build two stores east of the Anacostia River in Washington, D.C., Walmart has announced it will no longer do so.  One reason, according to the Washington Times, is that their three existing stores in D.C. are not performing as well as hoped.  But according to Townhall, the company also cited high building […]