Author Archive

Wages and the Cost of Employment

Recently, William Galston of the Brookings Institution penned an oped in the Wall Street Journal about the lack of workers’ wage growth despite a technically “full-employment” economy.  Adjusted for inflation, workers’ wages have grown 0.1 percent over the past year, and only 0.5 percent since 2010.  While there are many unknowns, he attributes some of the problem […]

Give Private Sector Workers An Option That Federal Workers Already Have

Two days ago, the House passed the “Working Families Flexibility Act of 2017,” that would allow employers to offer, and employees to receive, 1.5 hours comp time in lieu of overtime pay for any overtime hours worked.  It now must pass the Senate.  This a policy that the NCPA has long supported in modernizing the […]

Don’t Gut the Texas Workers’ Comp System

President Trump has some lofty goals for his first year in office, but during his first month in office, he spent ample time undoing many executive orders ushered in by the Obama administration. One particular area of concern was some controversial rules and actions from the Department of Labor.  Former Labor Secretary (now the Democratic […]

Great Moments in Government Waste, Fraud and Abuse

Donald Trump’s proposed “skinny budget” was released today.  Of course, the outrage and howls of indignation have begun.  Already, there are Twitter hashtags referencing cuts to programs for the poor (#Mealsonwheels is trending) and “hair on fire” claims that people and puppies will die because of EPA cuts, education cuts, public television cuts, and of course, the […]

Bloomberg-Funded Soda Tax Study Does Not Answer the Relevant Questions

Yesterday, I received an email from Health Affairs linking to some new studies that will run in their upcoming print edition.  One of them, “In Mexico, Evidence Of Sustained Consumer Response Two Years After Implementing A Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Tax,” caught my eye for obvious reasons.  First, using soda taxes to reduce the consumption of sugary drinks, […]

Disability Program on GAO’s “High Risk” List

Every two years the Government Accountability Office (GAO) identifies and reports on government operations that are “high risk” – meaning vulnerable to fraud, waste, abuse, mismanagement and inefficiency.  I know, I know…the entire government could be considered “high risk,” but for the sake of keeping this blog post short, let’s focus on one program identified in the GAO’s most recent […]

Are “Deficit Hawks” Prepared for Trump’s Proposed Spending Cuts?

It’s amazing how those who cared little for spending deficits during Obama’s presidency have suddenly become deficit hawks just hours before Trump’s inauguration.  (Paul Krugman, are you listening?) The national debt is now $20 trillion, double what it was eight years ago.  In all fairness President Obama was not responsible for all of this due to mandatory spending […]

Tax Extenders in 2017

In a rush to keep the government funded through April 2017, Congress passed a $1.1 trillion spending bill last month that includes no mention of tax cut extensions that expired at the end of 2016.  But take heart, most of the tax breaks that folks have become accustomed to were made permanent at the end […]

On A Personal Note

Update:  I ran the following blog post last year in response to the ubiquitous inflatable yard creatures that are found in most neighborhoods.  While I thought they may be on the decline, this year there are more than ever…and not just around Christmas time either. First, let me start by saying I love the free market – whether […]

Sam Johnson takes on Social Security Reform

As Chairman of the Social Security Subcommittee of House Ways and Means, Rep. Sam Johnson (R-Tex) has introduced the “Social Security Reform Act of 2016” as a way to extend the solvency of Social Security and eliminate many provisions that are seen as unfair.  Of course, the media and people on the left are couching […]