Author Archive

Social Insecurity

The 2016 Social Security Trustees Report has been a long time coming.  Usually it is released in the spring (although last year it wasn’t released until July), but I can’t say I blame the Trustees for the delay.  It looks bad.  Worse than last year.  The program that pays yours and my retirement benefits, either […]

Mining Takes a Hit in the Jobs Report

While Hillary Clinton is trying to convince Coal Country that she cares, the BLS reports that 7,000 jobs in mining were lost in April alone, totaling 191,000 mining and mining-related jobs lost since September 2014.  Earlier this week I wrote about the lack of political support for “dirty jobs” that actually pay quite well, and […]

Another Take on Slow Wage Growth, Part II

Yesterday, I elaborated on a WSJ article and some historical data highlighting slow wage growth.  While some policymakers may just shrug and insist that slow wage and GDP growth are the “new normal,” others seem to believe that simply waving the magic $15 minimum wage wand will fix everything.  Both are wrong.  Here is what could […]

Another Take on Slow Wage Growth, Part I

This week began with some not-so-peaceful May Day protests around the world.  Of particular interest was a demonstration in Seattle, where protestors demanded better wages and working conditions.  Oh…wait…doesn’t Seattle have a $15 an hour minimum wage law?  Evidently according to some, it is not enough for entry level work. According to the Wall Street […]

Oops! The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Gets Slapped Down

I recently wrote about the Financial Stability Oversight Council created under Dodd-Frank legislation in 2010. A federal judge had ruled that the FSOC did not prove its case in determining that MetLife posed a “threat to financial stability.” Enter the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), another unaccountable entity, thanks to Dodd-Frank.  In 2014, the CFPB […]

Will Dodd-Frank Implode? Let’s Hope So

There have been a few interesting developments lately regarding legal interpretations of Dodd-Frank.  Unfortunately, media outlets are too busy covering trivial matters such as bathroom bills to focus on the impacts of this poorly-conceived legislation that has been in place since 2010.  However, the Wall Street Journal has not disappointed, covering some major developments in federal […]

Where is the Stock Market Panic Now?

It occurred to me this week that I had not heard much about the stock market since it started going south in January.  So I perused the Internet and came across some interesting article headlines from times past: “Dow Falls Below 8,000: First Time Since ’03” (ABC News, Nov. 19, 2008) “Wall Street Cheers as […]

Again…We Should Be More Like Europe

Last week I wrote about big changes taking place in the United Kingdom, where Chancellor Osborne vowed to reduce corporate tax rates to 17 percent, the lowest of the G20 countries.   Meanwhile, the United States seems to want to keep its first place spot of having the highest corporate tax rate of the G20.  And […]

In Some Ways, We Should Be More Like Europe

Namely, the United Kingdom.  Yesterday Chancellor George Osborne announced his plan to lower the corporate tax rate from its current 20 percent to 17 percent in 2018. (It was originally planned to fall to 18 percent in 2018). Additionally, the U.K. capital gains tax top rate will all from 28 percent to 20 percent, and […]

Should Walmart Imitate Costco?

The following is the Executive Summary from a soon-to-be-published NCPA policy report. There has been much debate over the past few years about raising the national minimum wage to $10 or even $15 an hour. In areas where the minimum wage is at or slightly above the federal level of $7.25, unions have complained that […]