Congressional Spending Still Runs Amok

In the antebellum south, it is said that a common practice among slaveholders was to give a barrel of salt pork to slaves to divide amongst themselves. This scrambling and fighting for a share of the pork became equated with its political meaning in the early 1870s, according to Wendy McElroy of the Future of […]

Home Ownership versus Other Investments

Earlier this week, I released a report on which income groups benefit from mortgage-related tax deductions. It has generally been known that higher-income households reap greater tax advantages than lower-income households. Furthermore, studies have found that mortgage deductions do not necessarily increase home ownership. But they are politically popular and not going away anytime soon. […]

A Double Whammy: Travel Taxes That Fund Stadiums

Last week, NCPA released a report on travel taxes.  Hotel occupancy taxes comprise the largest share of taxes on an average trip, while plane ticket taxes and rental car taxes rank second and third.  Travel taxes are politically easy to levy, because it is assumed that those who pay them are “out of towners” and […]

More Flimsy Reasons For a $15 Minimum Wage

This post was written by Jacob Kohlhepp, a research associate at the National Center for Policy Analysis. A few weeks ago, Paul Krugman gave a gushing review of Hillary Clinton’s vague economic plans in his biweekly New York Times column.  Krugman does not even mention what specifically is good about the Hillary Plan. Yet he […]

Can We Stop Pretending That the Trustees Reports Are Good News?

In previous years, the 2015 Social Security and Medicare Trustees Reports were usually released in the spring, albeit on a Friday or perhaps around a holiday when little attention would be paid.  This year, the reports were released yesterday, months later than usual, with little fanfare, except for a few media outlets praising the findings.   The Huffington Post […]

The Minimum Wage Fairy Can’t Fix Everything

If a politician wants to ban something, chances are they will give themselves an exemption. Over the past year, the rallying cry for many politicians has been income inequality. One of the solutions often offered is a substantial increase in the minimum wage. Ironically, though, a recent study found that 94 percent of the 205 […]

The Greek Debt Crisis: Is There a Lesson To Be Learned?

The Greek debt crisis continues to linger on, as a recalcitrant Greek people unwilling to make the belt-tightening sacrifices asked of them, confront a resolute creditor, the European Central Bank, who seems to feel quite strongly that repaying one’s debts isn’t just some quaint notion from another era. Greece’ debt burden has grown to an […]

Net Neutrality Not the Savior One Might Think (Part II)

Last week, I explained what the FCC’s new “net neutrality” rules are intended to do, but here is the reality: A government decree will never resolve disputes in a way that enhances innovation and lowers costs for consumers.  Compliance with the net neutrality rules creates another barrier to entry for potential competitors to incumbent ISPs. […]

The “Living Wage” Argument is Back…As a Presidential Campaign Issue

Last week Salon’s Joan Walsh ran an editorial titled “Scott Walker’s Sleazy New Low.”  What did presidential candidate and Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker do to earn such scorn? He signed into law the 2015-2017 budget for the state of Wisconsin, which included a rewording of Wisconsin State Legislature Chapter 104. Previously chapter 104 § 02 stated, “every […]

Net Neutrality Not the Savior One Might Think (Part I)

The Internet was jubilant when the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) officially issued its net neutrality rules in February. And then, nothing happened. Since net neutrality rules officially came into effect on June 12 Internet providers have not raced to speed up Internet speeds, and a single complaint has been filed with the Federal Communications Commission […]