Internet Sales Tax Collection and Small Businesses

When my college roommate asked me to be her maid-of-honor I was thrilled. But with bridesmaids spread across three different states it was impossible to gather everyone together for a fitting. Instead, we used an online boutique to purchase the beautiful lace dresses we wore for her summer wedding.  The online store — which made bridesmaid […]

NCPA’s New DCGE Tax Model

In case you missed it yesterday, we here at NCPA are pleased to announce that we now have a tax model to – well – model taxes!  Developed by Beacon Hill Institute, the dynamic computable general equilibrium (DCGE) model, will measure the impact of tax changes on economic variables such as capital stock, employment and wages. […]

Hillary Clinton’s Corporate Profit-Sharing Plan – It’s Nothing to Get Excited About

The last thing government should ever be doing is providing taxpayer-financed incentives to fix things that aren’t broken.  Among her plans to “help” families, including college giveaways, Democratic presidential candidate Hilary Clinton wants to boost middle class incomes by incentivizing firms to share their profits. Under her profit-sharing plan, which she calls “Raising Incomes, Sharing Profits,” corporations that […]

Administration Efforts to Halt Tax Inversions Fall Short

Tax-driven corporate migration from the United States to countries with more favorable corporate tax regimes (which means just about anywhere else) continue, despite new rules put into effect by the Treasury Department last fall to curtail these so-called tax inversions. Fifty-five U.S. companies have been sold to, or targeted by, foreign buyers since the rules were […]

Congressional Spending Still Runs Amok

In the antebellum south, it is said that a common practice among slaveholders was to give a barrel of salt pork to slaves to divide amongst themselves. This scrambling and fighting for a share of the pork became equated with its political meaning in the early 1870s, according to Wendy McElroy of the Future of […]

Home Ownership versus Other Investments

Earlier this week, I released a report on which income groups benefit from mortgage-related tax deductions. It has generally been known that higher-income households reap greater tax advantages than lower-income households. Furthermore, studies have found that mortgage deductions do not necessarily increase home ownership. But they are politically popular and not going away anytime soon. […]

A Double Whammy: Travel Taxes That Fund Stadiums

Last week, NCPA released a report on travel taxes.  Hotel occupancy taxes comprise the largest share of taxes on an average trip, while plane ticket taxes and rental car taxes rank second and third.  Travel taxes are politically easy to levy, because it is assumed that those who pay them are “out of towners” and […]

More Flimsy Reasons For a $15 Minimum Wage

This post was written by Jacob Kohlhepp, a research associate at the National Center for Policy Analysis. A few weeks ago, Paul Krugman gave a gushing review of Hillary Clinton’s vague economic plans in his biweekly New York Times column.  Krugman does not even mention what specifically is good about the Hillary Plan. Yet he […]

Can We Stop Pretending That the Trustees Reports Are Good News?

In previous years, the 2015 Social Security and Medicare Trustees Reports were usually released in the spring, albeit on a Friday or perhaps around a holiday when little attention would be paid.  This year, the reports were released yesterday, months later than usual, with little fanfare, except for a few media outlets praising the findings.   The Huffington Post […]

The Minimum Wage Fairy Can’t Fix Everything

If a politician wants to ban something, chances are they will give themselves an exemption. Over the past year, the rallying cry for many politicians has been income inequality. One of the solutions often offered is a substantial increase in the minimum wage. Ironically, though, a recent study found that 94 percent of the 205 […]